KEEPING IT CLEAN IN THE CABARET

Posted: November 19, 2008 in El tango cuenta su historia
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KEEPING IT CLEAN IN THE CABARET

PLAYLIST

1. RE FA SI, Osvaldo Fresedo
2. DERECHO VIEJO, Osvaldo Fresedo
3. DONDE ESTAS, Osvaldo Fresedo with Blanca Mooney
4. EL ONCE (A DIVERTIRSE), Osvaldo Fresedo
5. DESPUES DEL CARNAVAL, Osvaldo Fresedo with Hugo Marcel
6. MILONGUERO VIEJO, Osvaldo Fresedo

SYNOPSIS

In the cabarets of president Alvear’s era, the tango reached a notoriety that had been denied to it until then.
Julio de Caro and Osvaldo Fresedo were the first exponents of a new form of performing the music of tango .

Similarly, the dance that had become the rage in France while the Argentine aristocracy crossed itself at its mere mention, now was making a triumphal entrance in the halls that the Argentina society had built to exclude the low class from the center of entertainment.

Far away were the uncertain beginnings and the first attempts to create a dance representative of the native pride. In the Argentina of the beginning of the twentieth century there were natives and white immigrants.
The latter ones had better opportunities to make a fortune due to the elitist feeling of the society.
For the natives it was necessary to create as a way to react against a backward social displacement.

The interaction between natives and foreigners were always colorfully marked by ridicule or irony towards the gringo. Whites as well as native browns utilized the dance as a way to emphasize their superiority over blacks and foreigners.

When the bourgeoisie of the first quarter of the century began dancing tango in the halls of the center of Buenos Aires, they made a concerted effort to remove all inference to the plebeian origin of the dance.
The expression “derecho viejo” was coined to define a way to dance the tango without stopping and breaking the vertical posture. That is to say, a new style was born, cleaned up, where the couple danced leaving some light between their bodies.

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